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 Posted 4/15/2012 8:27:29 PM
 

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I've been following the Dokken's Retriever Training book (mostly) working with my lab.  I started doing the gloved hand yesterday. One session of 5 hand in/ hand outs yesterday and 2 sessions with the same amount of repition today.  So far he isn't really fighting.  I hold his collar with left hand and put my gloved right hand all the way in until my index finger is behind his teeth.  The first time he just sat there.  I waited 3 seconds, said Drop, and pulled my hand out.  Every now and then he will move his head around but for the most part he has accepted it well.  I'm not going to rush it even though he is doing great because I want to make sure he is solid on retrieve.  I'm just curious since I have mostly heard and read about the dog fighting you with everything they have is this uncommon?  My dog has been extremely laid back and easy to train to this point.  He accepts new things very quickly.  So is him taking the hand easily really strange, or am I just really lucky?

A bad day in the blind beats a good day at work.
Post #767728
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 Posted 4/15/2012 9:23:24 PM
 

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i don't know jack about training, but am learning with this new golden pup i have.  Hunter the Wonder Lab was trained by a pro trainer.  i decided i would take a more active role early on with Sage.  he is just 4 months yesterday and well ahead of the book i'm using. 

my point here is......maybe you and i are are lucky!  :)

it happens.

how old is your lab?  


"Cripples are our worst legacy. Hunt with a Retriever."

Phil Robertson calls me for advice.
Post #767732
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 Posted 4/16/2012 7:59:48 AM
 

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Deuce is 6 months old.  What book are you using to train?  I have never trained a dog before but wanted to do it myself.  I knew I could make myself come up with the amount of time I needed to work with him and pro trainers are really expensive.  So far I'm glad I have done all the training myself.  He has picked up on everything extremely well and nothing is more fun than working on a new command and seeing that light come on when he finally understands exactly what you want him to do.  It's to the point now where working with him is my favorite thing to do.  I took him to the vet last Friday to make sure his adult teeth were all the way in before I started FF.  He is exactly 6 months old and already weighs 61 lbs.  He is long and very tall but slender right now.  When he fills out and gets full grown he is going to be a tank.

A bad day in the blind beats a good day at work.
Post #767735
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 Posted 4/16/2012 8:30:59 AM
 

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Well my friend, the good news is that because you have been training your dog a lot, that is the reason he is more readily accepting that hand right now. Well done, pat yourself on the back.

Generally the dogs that don't accept it and jump around like their rear end is on fire, are the dogs who haven't been trained very well in obedience.  When I work with a dog, no matter what the owner tells me, I always shore up the obedience before beginning ff.  Sounds like you have taken care of that.

Take your time and keep doing what you are doing.

One piece of advice to you as a first timer, more ear pressure (read pain here) doesn't make the dog respond more quickly as some think it would.  It can actually make your dog shut down.  I've found that if you use just enough pressure to make it uncomfortable, that's all you need and it allows the dog to be able to think it's way out of it.  

If you need more pointers on the timing of things when you get to that point, let us know.

Happy training!

Kg

<My new mission in life.....no more gunshy dogs>
Post #767736
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 Posted 4/16/2012 12:04:23 PM
 

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Thanks kg, I appreciate it.  I'm lucky enough to be able to take my dog with me to work everyday.  We work in the morning for 20 min, at lunch for 20 min, and in the evening for 20 min plus just spend a lot of fun time together.  I think him being with me all the time has been great to build up our relationship.

A bad day in the blind beats a good day at work.
Post #767737
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 Posted 4/17/2012 12:30:31 PM
 

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I"m following Dokken's book as you are with my lab.  He'll be 5 months next Thursday.  Found the same thing to be true.  Putting the gloved hand in the mouth and he just sat there like he wasn't bothered.  He's been quick to pick everything else up.

Keep up the good work with your lab.  Sounds like you're doing all the right things.
Post #767746
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 Posted 4/17/2012 8:09:18 PM
 

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OK, new question.  I've been continuing with 2 sessions a day of 5 hand ins/ hand outs.  The book I'm following says once your dog is accepting the hand try leaving it in longer to see how long he will accept it without fighting.  How long should I be able to leave my hand in his mouth without him getting restless before I move on?  Right now any given time I can put my hand in his mouth and he will calmly sit there for 7-10 seconds.  After that he doesn't really fight it he just starts figiting around and trying to wiggle his tounge.  Thanks for any advice.

Sir Gadwall,

Thanks for the compliment.  I've had just as many people tell me the weren't crazy about the book as people that loved it.  It might not be the best way but as we can agree you can't argue with results.  I'm loving how well my dog is working out.  Its got me really excited for early goose and early woodduck come september.


A bad day in the blind beats a good day at work.
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 Posted 4/18/2012 6:21:15 AM
 

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I always make sure the dogs I'm working with will accept the hand for up to a minute......longer if they were a battle for the first couple sessions.  No fidgeting, no chewing, no messing around....just sitting there with me holding on to their lower jaw.  

Remember to tell your pup what a good pup it is when it is performing the action you want....sitting calmly and accepting your hand.

Keep at it!

Kg

<My new mission in life.....no more gunshy dogs>
Post #767753
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